Smalls Lighthouse

Smalls Lighthouse

The Smalls Lighthouse stands on a small rock approximately 20 miles (32 kilometres) west of St David's Peninsula.   The lighthouse is the most remote lighthouse operated by Trinity house.

The original Smalls Lighthouse was erected over 1775 and 1776, on the plans of Liverpool musical instrument maker Henry Whiteside.  It stood on nine oak pillars, allowing the sea to pass through beneath.    Although it suffered from some rocking, it stood for 80 years.  During its life a significant number of extra struts were added beyond the original nine.  The pillar-based design has since been used successfully in many sea structures.

The current Smalls Lighthouse.  In 1859 Trinity House, having bought out the previous leaseholders in 1836,  began the construction of the current Lighthouse.  The tower was completed in 1861.  In 1978 a helideck was erected above the lantern and in 1987 the lighthouse was automated.

The first wind-and solar-powered lighthouse in the UK. Although it has only a 35 watt bulb, with the aid of lenses, this can be seen up to 21 miles (34 km) away. It was the first lighthouse in the country to have an installed flushing toilet.